Categories
Public Health

Building well being into cross govt policy. The Welsh approach

This is part 3 of a short series. Part 1 covered general notes Part 2 covers building well being into budgeting. Introduction the Welsh Government have legislated through the Well Being of Future Generations (Wales) Act 2015 which places duties on a number of public bodies to set and publish objectives; to make reasonable steps […]

Categories
Public Health

Building well being into budgets. The New Zealand approach

NZ Treasury site, broader commentary. There’s a good explanation here. As noted there are two key tests – 1) whether the 2019 Well-being Budgetprovides meaningful boost to the five priority areas, ie does it shift the cash, and 2) at what expense to what other policy areas. The New Zealand Treasury is using an approach […]

Categories
Public Health

Building Well Being into public policy5

Well Being and public policy 1. Definition , there is no single agreed definition. Its more than “happiness”. Most definitions have their basis in psychology and individuals. Few definitions focus on social cohesiveness, neighbourhoods and populations. Few – if any – focus on a whole sense of place that encompasses people, populations, spatial environment. Well […]

Categories
Determinants Public Health

The Home Office and a public health approach to knife crime

    Signs are Home Office going to take knife crime via a a PH approach Does this mean we will cut fund for the services that go into it & at the same time largely ignore the root causes of the things that lead to the problem in first place. Quick thoughts   1. Language […]

Categories
Prevention Public Health

Prevention and the green paper

Prevention and the green paper All of a sudden prevention is back in vogue. There’s going to be a Green Paper. Hurrah. I’ve written a lot on prevention in an health context already. Note I mention health not NHS there, deliberately. Firstly on the Secretary of State’s vision Prevention is better than cure and the […]

Categories
Inequality Public Health

A health inequalities strategy in 10 simple steps

A while ago I published a set of slides –  here – which were an attempt to tell the story of Health inequality in Sheffield from the 2014 “plan” through the discussions HWBB had in 2016 on this, through a HWBB workshop Dave Buck facilitated in early 2017 and to bring up to date. this […]

Categories
Public Health Screening Shared decisions

Screening Creep and the harm done

  I have been pretty vocal on ever creeping of proposals to screen for things a long way beyond National Screening Committee recommendation in the past. Lung cancer is the focus of this one. I wrote a lot on this a year or so ago in response to the planned rollout in G Mancs Carl […]

Categories
Public Health

Evidence in public health part 5 – general messages and broad rules

Previous posts covered the use and misuse of RCTs, and a broader take on evidence and public health, the double standards and burden of proof across different paradigms, tricky scenarios This post tries to give some generalizable rules pulling it all together. Underlying the double standards argument are three (at least) erroneous assumptions: (I) that […]

Categories
Evaluation Public Health

Handling evidence in tricky scenarios – social prescribing for example. Evidence in public health part 4

– Previous posts covered the use and misuse of RCTs, and a broader take on evidence and public health, the double standards and burden of proof across different paradigms. This post puts some thoughts out on evidence in some tricky areas, this time social prescribing. There is lots of support for social prescribing, but also […]

Categories
Evaluation Public Health

Evidence in public health- the double standards and burden of proof problem. Evidence in public health part 3

Evidence in public health part 3 – Evidence in public health- the double standards and burden of proof problem This is a long blog and has been a long time coming. It aims to build on some things I had written a little bit on the evidence around public health when I bumped into Prof […]